huffpostlive:

Charlo “F—-k it, I quit” Greene Lights A Joint Live On Air

After announcing she was leaving her job at the KTVA station in Anchorage, Alaska, by telling viewers, “F—k it, I quit,” she joined HuffPost Live on Thursday and smoked a joint live on the air.

"I’ll spark up right now. It is what it is. I’m in the privacy of my own home."

So yes, that happened.

(via huffingtonpost)

utnereader:

image

What Makes the American Empire Tick?

Can the American empire survive? In Decline and Fall, author John Michael Greer reasons that it cannot. Shedding new light on the misunderstood idea of empire and the costs of imperial overstretch, Greer shows how the U.S. has backed itself into a corner in the pursuit of political and economic power and explores the inevitable consequences of imperial collapse.

Reblogged from Utne Reader

todaysdocument:


"Books cannot be killed by fire. People die, but books never die. No man and no force can put thought in a concentration camp forever. No man and no force can take from the world the books that embody man’s eternal fight against tyranny. In this war, we know, books are weapons."
-Franklin D. Roosevelt
"Books are weapons in the war of ideas", 1941 - 1945
From the series: World War II Posters, 1942 - 1945

Banned Books Week is September 21 - 27, 2014

todaysdocument:

"Books cannot be killed by fire. People die, but books never die. No man and no force can put thought in a concentration camp forever. No man and no force can take from the world the books that embody man’s eternal fight against tyranny. In this war, we know, books are weapons."

-Franklin D. Roosevelt

"Books are weapons in the war of ideas", 1941 - 1945

From the series: World War II Posters, 1942 - 1945

Banned Books Week is September 21 - 27, 2014

(via truth-has-a-liberal-bias)

Many Americans are familiar with old-time speed traps, which became so notorious that most state legislatures reformed their systems to require local police and courts to deposit traffic fines into the state treasury to avoid the appearance of biased justice. Today, the old speed traps have all too often been replaced by forfeiture traps, where local police stop cars and seize cash and property to pay for local law enforcement efforts. This is a complete corruption of the process, and it unsurprisingly has led to widespread abuses.

Government self-interest corrupted a crime-fighting tool into an evil (via azspot)

(via truth-has-a-liberal-bias)

Source Washington Post

Reblogged from AZspot

newsweek:

It’s been over a decade since American psychologists Leaf Van Boven and Thomas Gilovich concluded that doing things makes people happier than having things. “To Do or to Have? That Is the Question” was the title of the study they published in 2003 (PDF), and it’s been cited hundreds of times since.
Many people now recognize that spending money on, say, a plane ticket for a vacation is more satisfying in the long run than purchasing a new television for the same price. But happiness studies keep evolving, and social scientists continue to find new ways of understanding precisely how our economic choices affect well-being.
A new paper, this one also co-authored by Thomas Gilovich, hones in on another difference between experiential and material purchases: how people feel before they make these purchases, when they’re simply entertaining thoughts of booking flights to the Caribbean or going to the movies, or thinking about shopping for clothing or jewelry.
Gilovich and his colleagues asked subjects to think about either an experiential or material purchase they were planning on making very soon, evaluate whether their anticipation made them feel excited or impatient, and rate the overall pleasantness of the anticipation.
The researchers also conducted a separate study in which they polled 2,226 adults on their iPhones at random times to ask whether the individuals were, in that moment, contemplating any future purchases (and if so, whether the purchase would be experiential or material, and whether they associated the thoughts with markedly pleasant, exciting, or impatient anticipatory feelings).
You Should Spend Money on Experiences, Not Things - CityLab

newsweek:

It’s been over a decade since American psychologists Leaf Van Boven and Thomas Gilovich concluded that doing things makes people happier than having things. “To Do or to Have? That Is the Question” was the title of the study they published in 2003 (PDF), and it’s been cited hundreds of times since.

Many people now recognize that spending money on, say, a plane ticket for a vacation is more satisfying in the long run than purchasing a new television for the same price. But happiness studies keep evolving, and social scientists continue to find new ways of understanding precisely how our economic choices affect well-being.

A new paper, this one also co-authored by Thomas Gilovich, hones in on another difference between experiential and material purchases: how people feel before they make these purchases, when they’re simply entertaining thoughts of booking flights to the Caribbean or going to the movies, or thinking about shopping for clothing or jewelry.

Gilovich and his colleagues asked subjects to think about either an experiential or material purchase they were planning on making very soon, evaluate whether their anticipation made them feel excited or impatient, and rate the overall pleasantness of the anticipation.

The researchers also conducted a separate study in which they polled 2,226 adults on their iPhones at random times to ask whether the individuals were, in that moment, contemplating any future purchases (and if so, whether the purchase would be experiential or material, and whether they associated the thoughts with markedly pleasant, exciting, or impatient anticipatory feelings).

You Should Spend Money on Experiences, Not Things - CityLab

Reblogged from Newsweek